International Institute for
Indigenous Resource Management

STAFF AND ASSOCIATES

The International Institute for Indigenous Resource Management is fortunate to have such a distinguished company of experts associated with it. Institute Associates are highly regarded by, and very active in their respective disciplines. Institute Associates' writings appear frequently in prestigious legal, cultural resources, and other professional journals. They are often invited to lecture at professional conferences and symposia and they are frequently called upon to serve on national and international advisory bodies.

Institute Associates operate independently of the Institute. They manage and operate their own consulting practices or are employed by Indian tribes or other native organizations. Associates conduct research on highly technical projects. They also serve as faculty in the Institute's training programs. The work in which the Institute is engaged usually involves more than one of the disciplines represented by our Associates. Institute Associates have worked together and with our staff and interns on numerous research and technical assistance projects with each Associate providing input to a project according to their specialized expertise and experience. This collegiality has resulted in efficiency, synergy, and a tremendous learning experience for Institute interns.

 

Audrey Aubard
Aubard Consulting
18 chemin de Lourqueyre
33 360 Camblanes et Meynac
France
audrey.aubard@gmail.com
Phone: +33 9 77-72-03-42

Audrey Aubard is an International Free Lance Consultant, specializing in quality labeling and branding strategies. Audrey is also a senior legal expert on intellectual property issues. She assisted countries including Cambodia, Morocco, Lebanon, and Benin establish protected geographic indications systems. She also aids producers and manufacturers incorporate geographic indications and other labeling strategies to protect their products. She helped the producers of Argane Oil in Morocco to establish their PGI which was recognized in 2009.

Audrey also teaches these subjects at Bordeaux 3 University. Previously, she worked at the French Institution of quality and origin (INAO); at the Legal and International Department, mainly on the international protection of GIs and the development of GIs international cooperation (South America, Asia and Africa). Audrey holds a Master degree in European and International law and postgraduates in Environmental law and agro-food law.

Russel L. Barsh
Center for the Study of Coast Salish Environments
2108-G Fisherman Bay Road
Lopez, WA 98261
U.S.A.
rlbarsh@gmail.com
Phone: +1 360-468-2808

Russel Barsh studied human ecology and evolution before switching to law, and has been involved in Indigenous advocacy in several capacities--as a litigator in disputes over sacred sites and ceremonies; as a diplomatic agent for the Mi'kmaq Grand Council; as a consultant with international agencies such as the International Labour Office and UNDP; and above all as a teacher and writer. His work in the area of international business has included a four-year study of conflicts between multinational corporations and indigenous peoples worldwide funded by the MacArthur Foundation and the United Nations, and the book Effective Negotiation by Indigenous Peoples: An Action Guide, written with Krisma Bastien. Russel has taught at the University of Washington and University of Lethbridge (Alberta, Canada), and as a visitor at Harvard Law School, New York University Law School, and Dartmouth College.

Russel is currently studying Coast Salish environments and operates a program that includes archaeology, palaeoecology, and restoration ecology, as well as a special science program for high school and university students. Recent publications on the legal and scientific dimensions of Indigenous science and medicine include "How Do You Patent A Landscape?" in the International Journal of Cultural Property (2000); "The Epistemology of Traditional Healing Systems" in Human Organization (1997); "Chronic Health Effects of Dietary Change" in Medical Anthropology (1997); and "Driving Bison and Blackfoot Science" in Human Ecology.

Steven R. Becker, CEP
Environmental Scientist/Planner
College of Rural and Community Development
University of Alaska Fairbanks
P.O. Box 756720
Fairbanks, AK 99775-6720
U.S.A.
Email: steve.becker@alaska.edu
Phone: +1 907-474-5096; FAX: +1 907-474-5208

Steve Becker is an Assistant Professor of Tribal Management at the Interior-Aleutians Campus of the University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF), where his focus is on Indigenous Science Education. Steve teaches Tribal Natural Resource and Tribal Transportation Management classes as well as serving as the undergraduate research mentor for the Gaalee'ya STEM program. He also teaches graduate coursework in Environmental Management and Law for the UAF Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and in Cultural and Intellectual Property Rights for the UAF Center for Cross-Cultural Studies.

Steve is a Certified Environmental Professional (CEP #5040343) in environmental documentation and a USDA-registered Certified Planner ( TSP #04-3529) for conservation, area-wide, and watershed planning. He has a Bachelor of Science in Natural Resources Management with a minor in Geology and a Master of Arts in Cross-Cultural Studies with an emphasis in Indigenous Planning, both from UAF. He is currently completing both a Master of Science degree in Environmental Quality Science (Phytoremediation) and a Ph.D. in Indigenous Studies (Indigenous Science Education).

Prior to joining UAF, Mr. Becker was a Senior Environmental Scientist and Planner for ASCG Incorporated/WHPacific, where he served as the lead NEPA and wetlands specialist for the Alaska region, and as the head of the environmental department for PDC Inc. Consulting Engineers.  Steve has also served as a U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) Regulatory Project Manager in Fairbanks and as a Field Office Manager/District Conservationist for the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) in Bethel and Nome. He also owns a small consulting firm, Village Management Services LLC, which specializes in providing environmental services for Tribes and Tribal entities. His professional work experience includes transportation, environmental, and land use planning, environmental impact assessment and NEPA documentation, environmental permitting, hazard and damage assessments for erosion and flood events, planning for village relocation, flood plain management studies, and emergency preparedness and response.

Mark A. Calamia, Ph.D.
Ecological/Environmental Anthropologist
Department of Anthropology
University of North Texas
P.O. Box 310409
Denton, Texas 76203-0409
U.S.A.
E-mail: markcalamia@hotmail.com
Phone: +1 940-369-6980

Mark Calamia works an assistant professor in applied cultural anthropology at the University of North Texas, where his focus is on teaching environmental anthropology. He is also the owner of a small consulting firm--Ethnographic Inquiry--that assists conservation NGOs, tribes, companies, and federal agencies with government-to-government consultation concerning cultural and natural resource management issues. Part of Mark's consultation work is in the American Southwest where he emphasizes ethnographic and ethnohistoric assessment of indigenous cultural landscapes, traditional cultural properties, and sacred sites. His recent work has involved several Indian tribes residing near the Colorado River . His other applied research focuses on the application of traditional ecological knowledge (TEK) for adaptive management of marine resources. In the Fiji Islands of the South Pacific, Mark has been focusing his research on the institutional dynamics involved in the establishment of community-based marine protected areas and the development of policy for local capacity building. He also is examining how customary systems of sea tenure and associated resource management regimes change due to local and global forces. As a consultant, Mark has organized and taught marine environmental awareness and conservation workshops in villages for indigenous Fijians. He also has co-instructed a workshop on TEK for the IIIRM, and currently is developing a workshop—with the OceanLearn program of the International Ocean Institute, Australia—on TEK and marine protected area management for practitioners in the Pacific Island region. Mark is the author of peer-reviewed articles on the integration of TEK with GIS for marine resource management. His other published works and presentations focus on socio-cultural institutions in the establishment of community-based marine protected areas in Fiji. Mark also is the lead author of a study on the indigenous taxa of marine organisms in Kadavu Province, Fiji. Mark served as a research scholar with the Macmillan Brown Centre for Pacific Studies in Christchurch, New Zealand. He is currently an affiliate with the Center for Heritage Resource Studies (CHRS); an associate with the International Ocean Institute (IOI); and a member of the IUCN World Commission on Protected Areas; IUCN Commission on Environmental, Economic and Social Policy (CEESP); and IUCN Working Group on Indigenous and Local Communities, Equity, and Protected Areas. In 2007 Mark received a 3-year appointment as a Visiting Senior Researcher with the School of Sociology and Anthropology at the University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand .

Ray Clark
The Clark Group, LLC
503 Capitol Court NE, Suite 300
Washington, DC 20002
U.S.A.
rayclark@clarkgroupllc.com
Phone: +1 202-544-8200; FAX: +1 202-544-8330; Mobile: +1 202-285-0858

Ray Clark has been a leader in developing policy and implementing the National Environmental Policy Act for more than 25 years. He managed the Army's NEPA program from 1986-1990. He wrote the first major revision of the Army's NEPA regulations and was the Army's liaison to the White House Council on Environmental Quality. He was directly responsible for compliance in the Biological Defense Research Program, the Intermediate Range Nuclear Forces Treaty, Base Closure and Realignment, and the Chemical Weapons Disposal Program.

In 1992, he was asked to come to the White House Council on Environmental Quality as the Senior Policy Analyst. In 1994, he was named Acting Chairman during a transition period within CEQ. As a result of his initiatives and accomplishments during this period, he was awarded the prestigious National Environmental Quality Award by the Natural Resources Council of America. From 1994 to 1999, Ray was Associate Director at the White House Council on Environmental Quality. In that capacity he was advisor to the President, the Chair of the Council, and the White House staff regarding national environmental policy. In 1999 he was named by President Clinton to the post of Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Army for Installations and Environment. He served as acting Assistant Secretary of the Army until April 2001, during the transition period of the administration of President George W. Bush.

Back to top.

Kim Alire Epley
Alire Group Facilitation Services
1030 Jasmine Street
Denver, CO 80220
U.S.A.
E-mail: kim@aliregroup.com
Phone: +1 303-601-3794; +1 FAX: 303-355-0162


Kim is a master facilitator and trainer with 22 years experience. The great majority of her work has been with tribal governments and indigenous organizations in the United States, Mexico, Nicaragua and Canada. She is especially adept at weaving consensus among multi-cultural audiences without compromising integrity or authority. Ms. Epley has collaborated tribes and indigenous organizations to create culturally and organizationally appropriate participatory strategic planning models. She has both a breadth and depth of experience having facilitated hundreds of events in areas as diverse as economic development, environmental protection, social service delivery, public health, managed healthcare systems, education, justice and safety systems. Her work has included the design, delivery and evaluation of programs, program planning, public participation events and training in participatory methods.

After twenty years work with non-profit organizations nationally and internationally, in 1997 she started her own business, the Alire Group Facilitation Services. Through this dynamic organization Kim delivers customized planning facilitation for governments, organizations, boards and coalitions. She continues to develop customized training workshops. In addition to training in basic facilitation methods, and strategic planning, she specializes in integrated curriculum development, participatory conferences, participatory presentation skills, and training shared work teams in implementation of planning. Ms. Epley is fluent in Spanish.
Barbara L. Harper
44803 Alderbrook Court
West Richland , WA 99353
U.S.A.

E-mail: bharper@amerion.com
Phone: +1 509-967-5174; FAX: +1 509-967-5174

Dr. Harper is a board-certified toxicologist (Diplomate of the American Board of Toxicology). She received her B.A. degree cum laude from Occidental College in biology, with departmental honors. She received her PhD in genetics from the University of Texas at Austin , and then did post-doctoral work at the University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB) at Galveston in the Departments of Medicine and Human Biological Chemistry and Genetics. For 8 years, she taught medical and graduate courses and lectured in genetics, toxicology, environmental health, preventive medicine, public health, research design, bioethics and intellectual property rights, blood banking, pharmacology, nutrition, and developmental toxicology as Assistant Professor in the UTMB Department of Preventive Medicine and Community Health's Division of Genetic and Environmental Toxicology. She has published numerous research papers, obtained and administered research grants, served on faculty committees and student advisory committees, and served on community health advisory committees. In 1989 she took a position with the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania ' s Department of Environmental Resources, and developed and managed the Special Science and Resources Program. Barbara taught risk assessment as an adjunct faculty member at Penn State Harrisburg during this time period as well. She was recruited by Battelle's Pacific Northwest National Lab as a program manager in risk assessment in 1993 ( Hanford ), where she started working on tribal risk issues. She joined the Yakama Nation ERWM Program in 1997 and developed methods for tribal risk assessment methods now in use at DOE and EPA, and continues to develop tribally-relevant spatial analysis methods for evaluating cumulative risks and impacts to tribal health and culture based on traditional holistic environmental management principles. She was Vice Chair of the Hanford Natural Resources Trustee Council and is currently on EPA's National Science Advisory Board (Drinking Water Committee). She is currently a consultant with AESE, Inc. working on various tribal risk issues.

Stuart G. Harris
Director, Department of Science and Engineering
Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation
P.O. Box 638
Pendleton, OR 97801
U.S.A.
E-mail: stuartharris@ctuir.com
Phone: +1 541-966-2408; FAX: +1 541-278-5380

Stuart Harris, the Institute Senior Cultural Risk Associate, is a member of the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR). He earned B.S. degrees from Eastern Oregon State University and Oregon State University. Mr. Harris is the principal advisor to CTUIR decision-makers on risk issues. He develops policy and technical guidance for and briefs tribal decision-makers on, CTUIR positions on risk-based cleanup levels and integration of Department of Energy oversight at Hanford. He has developed tribal risk assessment and exposure models for the CTUIR, other tribes and tribal organizations including the Columbia River Intertribal Fish Commission. He is the primary reviewer of risk-focused and other technical documents from the Department of Energy and has specialized in analyzing impacts to tribal culture, resources, and health.

Mr. Harris is the CTUIR’s liaison to academic, tribal, governmental and professional agencies and organizations on risk-related issues and has worked extensively with the University of Washington’s Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation, the Council of Energy Resource Tribes, National Tribal Environmental Council, and the Society for Risk Analysis. Stuart has served on several advisory committees including DOE’s Community Leaders’ Network, Site Technology Coordination Group Management Council, and the Hanford Advisory Board. He has written extensively on the tribal culture-risk interface. Among his latest writings with Dr. Barbara Harper are: Risk Assessment for Tribal Communities: A Native American Exposure Scenario in Risk Analysis; and Risk Assessment for Native Americans presented at the 4th Tribal Risk Forum, Albuquerque, 1997: The Native American Exposure Scenario presented at the Sixth International Conference on Radioactive Waste Management and Environmental Remediation, Singapore, October 16-20, 1997 and, Developing a Native American Exposure Model presented at the Society for Risk Analysis, Washington, D.C., 1997.

Larry Lepley
8841 North Calle Loma Linda
Tucson, AZ 85737
U.S.A.
E-mail: lklepley@earthlink.net
Phone: +1 520-575-8082; FAX: +1 520-575-6582

Dr. Lepley is the Institute’s Associate for remote sensing, geophysics, and sensors. In his 18 years of consulting, Larry has completed remote sensing projects on all continents of the globe for domestic and foreign, commercial and government clients. Applications included environmental characterization, natural resources and land use mapping, and mineral resources exploration. Dr. Lepley's use of remote sensing for environmental assessment included detection, location and characterization of toxic wildcat dumps, acid mine drainage sources and surface water pollution.

Dr. Lepley designs and expedites airborne remote sensing surveys, and analyzes and interprets hyperspectral, multispectral, thermal infrared and radar data from aircraft and satellites. He conducts on-site field spectral ground truth surveys to verify image analysis. Larry is an expert in spectral, thermal and microwave properties of natural terrestrial and marine materials. He designed and developed several sensor systems to working prototypes.

In Cairo, Egypt, Larry directed a four-year, $4 million technology transfer project at the Egyptian Remote Sensing Center and three other Egyptian resource agencies. He directed the University of Arizona's first remote sensing center, where he coordinated 13 NASA satellite remote sensing experiments. He was International Project Manager for an Austrian remote sensing company. Larry was a member of four Arctic and Antarctic expeditions.

Dr. Lepley was awarded a Ph.D. in Geophysics by the University Hawaii, where he specialized in remote sensing instrumentation, natural spectra, optics, microwaves and electromagnetics. He received a B.S. in Geological Engineering from Colorado School of Mines, where he specialized in aerial photo-interpretation and geomorphology.

Back to top.
Tammy Mitnik
SRS Technologies
Washington Group
1915 Aerotech Drive, Suite D
Colorado Springs, Colorado 80916-4222
U.S.A.
E-mail: MITNIKT1@aol.com
Phone: +1 719-785-3127


Ms. Tammy Mitnik is a Project Manager for SRS Technologies, an industry leader in supporting the Department of Defense including, Navy, Marine Corps, and OSD in the areas of military range and airspace planning, National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) environmental planning, range and environmental applications of Geographic Information System (GIS) technologies, analysis of encroachment and noise impacts on training, and public outreach support services.

Ms. Mitnik is a Certified Environmental Professional and a Registered Environmental Manager with 25 years of National Guard experience, ten of which have been exclusively devoted to the programming, management, and execution of National Environmental Policy Act and Environmental Baseline Survey Programs. She has been directly involved in supporting land acquisitions, land excise, lease renewal, airspace modification and acquisition, major construction efforts and aircraft conversions,
implementation of Master Plans, land use management plans, facilities and infrastructure development for more than 100 National Guard units across the nation.

Ms. Mitnik is a retired United States Air Force Lieutenant Colonel with a Master of Business Administration Management and Bachelor of Science in Public Safety. Ms. Mitnik is a Certified Environmental Professional in Environmental Assessment (Certificate No. 04030340) and a Registered Environmental Manager (Certificate No. 11060). Her Air Force assignments included Environmental Planner, Disaster Preparedness Officer and Non-Commissioned Officer, and Mission Support First Sergeant. Ms. Mitnik currently resides in Colorado.
Back to top.
Patrick O'Keefe
International Legal Consultant
P.O. Mailbox 8049
Toowoomba Mail Centre
Toowoomba, Queensland 4352
Australia
E-mail: ockiff@bigpond.com
Phone: +61 7-46-309-357


Patrick J. O'Keefe has specialized for nearly thirty years in heritage law and management. He is the author of more than 100 books, reports and articles on the subject and is a member of international expert bodies such as the International Council of Museums and the International Council on Monuments and Sites. He is a Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries of London; an Associate Fellow of the Society of Advanced Legal Studies and was foundation Chairman of the Cultural Heritage Law Committee of the International Law Association. Now acting as a consultant to such bodies as UNESCO, Council of Europe, World Bank etc., O'Keefe previously had a distinguished career in the Australian Public Service and at the University of Sydney.

O'Keefe has long had an interest in protecting the rights of indigenous people, particularly in respect of their cultural heritage whether it be song, dance, music or the more material forms. Together with his wife, Dr. Lyndel Prott, he is currently working on Volume II of their five volume series (two published) Law and the Cultural Heritage which deals with many of these matters. Among his activities, he was one of the drafters of the Mataatua Declaration and edited an issue of the International Journal of Cultural Property devoted to indigenous peoples and cultural heritage.
Back to top.

Lyndel Prott
International Legal Consultant
P.O. Mailbox 8049
Toowoomba Mail Centre
Toowoomba, Queensland 4352
Australia
E-mail: lvprott@hotmail.com
Phone: +61 7-46-309-357

Lyndel Vivien Prott holds the degrees of B.A., LL.B. of the University of Sydney, a Licence Spéciale en Droit international of the Free University of Brussels, Belgium, and of Dr. Juris of the Eberhard-Karls University of Tübingen in Germany. She was officer of the Legal and Treaties Section of the Australian Department of Foreign Affairs for 4 years and later for 17 years had a distinguished career as an academic, teaching and researching at the Faculty of Law at the University of Sydney. Her expertise in Comparative Law, International Law, Jurisprudence, and especially in Cultural Heritage Law, where she is regarded as one of the pioneers of the subject, led to her appointment to a personal Chair in Cultural Heritage Law at that University, from which she resigned after taking up her post at UNESCO as Chief of the International Standards Section in the Division of Cultural Heritage in 1990. Dr Prott retired from UNESCO as Director of its Division of Cultural Heritage in April 2002.

Dr. Prott has lectured at many universities and institutes around the world and has authored, co-authored or edited over 200 books, reports or articles. She has written in English, French and German and been published in Arabic, Croat, Chinese, Italian, Magyar, Russian, Spanish and Ukrainian. With her husband, Dr. P.J.O'Keefe, she is co-authoring the fundamental research text in cultural heritage law Law and the Cultural Heritage of which two of the planned 5 volumes are already published. Her book on the International Court of Justice The Latent Power of Culture and the International Judge 1979 and her more recent Commentary on the UNIDROIT Convention 1995 are also well known among experts in international law. She is on the Editorial Board of three international specialist Journals.

Back to top.
Jeanne M. Rubin
General Counsel
International Institute for Indigenous Resource Management
444 South Emerson Street
Denver, CO 80209-2216
U.S.A.
E-mail: jeannerubin@iiim.org
Phone: +1 303-733-0481; FAX: +1-303-744-9808


Ms. Rubin comes to the Institute from private practice in Denver which concentrated in Indian law with an emphasis on gaming and general commercial concerns. Ms. Rubin served as Special Gaming Counsel to the Ute Mountain Ute Tribe from 1992-1999 and in that capacity advised and represented tribal officials on a full range of regulatory, jurisdictional and commercial issues. In the International arena she has represented and consulted with Maori tribal organizations and educational institutions. Jeanne was for several years a policy analyst with the Administration for Native Americans in the Department of Health and Human Services. Ms. Rubin has lectured at seminars sponsored by the National Indian Gaming Association, National Congress of American Indians, the Council of Energy Resource Tribes, the CERT Tribal Environmental Institute, the Bureau of Indian Affairs, International Gaming & Wagering Business (IGWB), the American Bar Association and the Colorado Bar Association on a variety of tribal gaming, contract and environmental issues.

Ms. Rubin holds a Juris Doctor from Stanford University. She currently serves as General Counsel to the Institute.

Back to top.
James W. Spensley
Spensley and Associates
1635 Ivanhoe Street
Denver, CO 80220
U.S.A.
E-mail: jwspensley@aol.com
Phone: +1 303-888-1290; FAX: +1 303-322-7203


Skip has worked for over twenty-five years as an environmental practitioner providing strategic, planning and management advice to clients and government agencies on environmental matters. He has worked with the President’s Council on Environmental Quality in the early 1970’s and as a consultant to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency during its early years. Mr. Spensley served as a professional staff member of the U.S. Congress House of Representatives for several environmental and energy subcommittees. Mr. Spensley is one of the country’s experts on the National Environmental Policy Act and its application to federal actions. He has worked extensively with community groups and organizations on the environmental concerns of large projects.

Mr. Spensley is an adjunct professor and has taught at the University of Colorado and University of Denver Law School and Graduate Environmental Management and Policy Program in the environmental area since 1980. His specialty has been environmental policy development and management in both private and governmental organizations. In addition, he teaches two to three environmental courses annually for the Institute, Government Institutes, Inc., Executive Enterprise, Inc., and the federal Office of Personnel Management in their Executive Leadership Program.
Back to top.

David J. Stephenson, Jr.
5345 East 129th Avenue
Thornton, CO 80241
U.S.A.
E-mail: davids6@indra.com
Phone: +1 303-596-1118

Dave works with the Institute on intellectual property, biodiversity, and ethnobiology issues. He is both a lawyer (J.D., U. of Denver College of Law 1984) and an applied sociocultural anthropologist (Ph.D., U. of Colorado 1982; M.A. 1975). He received his undergraduate education at Dartmouth College (A.B. 1972). ). He is a co-founder and former Chair of the Rocky Mountain Human Rights Law Group. During the Winter term, 2002, he was an Honorarium Professor of International Law in the Department of Political Science, University of Colorado at Denver. He regularly speaks to and contributes to publications for diverse audiences throughout the world regarding emerging legal and ethical issues arising from intellectual property, trademark, copyright, and trade secret infringement, and the intellectual property rights of indigenous peoples. He has over 25 years of diverse public and private sector experience in cross-cultural socioeconomic analysis and is licensed to practice law in Colorado state and federal courts, the Federal Court of Claims, and several tribal courts and has testified internationally as an expert on international human rights and intellectual property law. He practices in the areas of intellectual property law, litigation, technology, emerging growth, and e-commerce law, business and corporate law, and international law.

Back to top.
Mervyn L. Tano
President
International Institute for Indigenous Resource Management
444 South Emerson Street
Denver, CO 80209-2216
U.S.A.
E-mail: mervtano@iiirm.org
Phone: +1 303-733-0481; FAX: +1 303-744-9808


Mr. Tano is an attorney and the president of the International Institute for Indigenous Resource Management. He has been working on tribal and indigenous peoples’ issues since the early 1970s as the director of planning and budget for the Administration for Native Americans, as a private consultant and as the general counsel and director of environmental programs at the Council of Energy Resource Tribes. Merv has been a member of several national advisory boards including the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Federal Facilities Environmental Restoration Dialogue Committee, the U.S. Department of Energy’s Community Leaders Network and Transportation External Coordination Working Group. He is on the technical advisory committee of the Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation. He was a member of the National Research Council’s Committee to Review Risk Management in the DOE’s Environmental Remediation Program in 1994 and the NRC Committee to Evaluate the Science, Engineering, and Health Basis of the Department of Energy’s Environmental Program in 1995. He has been a member of the program advisory committee of the Waste Management Symposia in Tucson, Arizona since 1994 and is currently a member of the Siting and Waste Facilities Subcommittee of the National Environmental Justice Advisory Council.
Back to top.