International Institute for
Indigenous Resource Management

4th ANNUAL DENVER INDIGENOUS FILM & ARTS FESTIVAL

Celebrating Identity through Art, Dance, Music & Sports
4th Annual Denver Indigenous Film & Arts Festival
October 9-14, 2007

The International Institute for Indigenous Resource Management is proud to present the 4th Annual Indigenous Film & Arts Festival in Denver, Colorado from October 9-14, 2007. Our theme this year is Celebrating Identity through Art, Dance, Music & Sports. The Festival will open on October 9th with an art preview and artist's reception at the Native American Trading Company, featuring the works of Bunky EchoHawk. This year the Festival includes film screenings, filmmaker appearances and live performances at various Denver venues including the Denver Indian Center, Museo de las Americas, Starz FilmCenter, the University of Denver (in partnership with the Native Student Alliance), and Dazzle Jazz Club. Below are our Preliminary Film Selections. A daily Festival schedule with show times and ticket prices will be posted next month.

Preliminary Film Selections

 

The Ballad of Peter LaFarge, Dir. Sandra Hale Schulman. Peter LaFarge, the writer of The Ballad of Ira Hayes, and a friend to Johnny Cash and Bob Dylan, was an unsung hero at the crossroads of folk, native, blues and protest music.

   

Brown Sugar. A short story about a young Maori woman's dreams of becoming a singer. From the Pasifika Dreams Series produced by Maori film icon Don C. Selwyn.

 

Clean Fight, Dir. Michael Patience. The story of First Nations kick-boxing champion Trevor “The Red Dragon” Queezenence who loses a championship match when he experiences diabetic shock. With a trainer who wants to get him back in the ring, and a girlfriend who wants him to quit, Trevor learns to balance his drive to compete with the limitations of his condition. A positive message about learning how to live one's dreams within the limitations of a health condition.

 

The Fighting Cholitas. This documentary profiles the Cholitas that perform Lucha Libre in Bolivia. A group of bold, female, Bolivian wrestlers push the limits of their culture by performing the acrobatic maneuvers of Lucha Libre every Sunday – in the traditional long skirts that characterize the cholitas.

   

Games of the North. This documentary presents traditional Alaskan Native games with insights into the physical and mental challenges they present. From the Alaska Native Heritage Center .

 

Gesture Down: I Don't Sing, Dir. Cedar Sherbert. The filmmaker shares a poetic and personal reflection of his journey south from California to Mexico in search of the “last” traditional Kumeyaay singer. Inspired by James Welch's poem “Gesture Down to Guatemala .”

 

Kumeyaay: Survival in the Weave, Dir. Edward Kramer. The story of master basket weavers from a Kumeyaay village in Baja California using their ancient weaving tradition to make modern day commodities and walking the delicate line between product and sacred tradition. (15 min.)

 

Kumu Hula: Keepers of a Culture. Dir. Robert Mugge. Hula is the dance of the Hawaiian people and has been practiced since early Polynesians arrived in the islands around 500 AD. Passed on from generation to generation by kahuna (priests and sages) and by kumu hula (master teachers), the hula has also been suppressed by 19 th century missionaries and plantation owners, distorted by Hollywood movies, and exploited by the local tourist industry. In this film, many of Hawaii 's finest kumu hula reveal ancient traditions which have survived and flourished for hundreds of years, revealing Hawaiian culture as few outsiders have seen it: rich, expressive, colorful, and totally unique. (85 min.)

   

Merrepen. Dir. Steven McGregor. Meet the ladies from the Merrepen Art Center as they demonstrate how to gather and prepare materials for weaving and contemplate the future of Australian Aboriginal arts and culture. “There are not are not enough elders left. That's why we are painting our stories and making things.” (24 min.)

 

Newen, Dir. Jennifer Aguilar Silva. JAAS is a Chilean hip hop artist in search of her Mapuche roots in a country which has a tradition of negating its indigenous heritage. Over the years she has sought out and learned much about the history and language of her people. In this music video, shot on Mapuche land in the South of Chile, JAAS raps in both Spanish and Mapudungun. Newen (life-force) is a call to the ancestors to awaken the enduring strength within the Mapuche people, as they continue in the struggle to maintain their land and cultural identity. (3 min.)

 

Polynesian Power, Dir. Jeremy Spear & Robert Pennington. This documentary, narrated by Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson, chronicles the ascent of Polynesians in American Football and the cultural history that defines this journey. Profiling two Samoan athletes, Pisa Tinoisamoa and Isaac Sopoaga -- one from the islands and one from the ‘hood -- Polynesian Power explores America 's diversity and the challenge of chasing dreams.

  Teachings of the Tree People. Teachings of the Tree People is a tribute to the life and work of Skokomish elder Gerald Bruce Miller (subiyay), a nationally prominent cultural leader and teacher who brought his talents home to lead a cultural renaissance in the Pacific Northwest. His story offers a powerful model of cultural and environmental stewardship. Featuring an in person appearance by produce r Tracy Rector. A free screening in partnership with the University of Denver (Native Student Alliance, Native Law Students Association, Center for Multicultural Excellence and Partners in Learning).
 

The Velvet Devil, Dir. Dir. Larry J. Bauman. The year is 1945. The glamorous singing sensation known as The Velvet Devil is performing on-stage at the legendary Hippodrome in Toronto. but in the middle of her signature tune, strange things begin to happen – a premonition, a telegram, sad and terrible news…Soon Velvet is on a train home, back to the Canadian prairies she fled so long ago, for her mother's funeral. We travel with Velvet as she journeys through her troubled past and comes to embrace her Métis heritage that she once rejected. Featuring actor, writer & singing sensation Andrea Menard, appearing in person.

 

When the Season is Good: Artists of Arctic Alaska, Dir. Andrew Okpeaha MacLean. An ivory carver, a skin sewer, a sculptor, a painter...'When the Season is Good' depicts the lives and art of four contemporary Alaska Native artists from the Bering Sea and Arctic region. Through their personal stories, the film explores the juncture of art, culture, economics, and survival in some of the most remote places in the world where long-held cultural traditions and a lifestyle of hunting, fishing and gathering exist alongside everyday modern life.

     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     

BECOME A FRIEND OF THE INDIGENOUS FILM FESTIVAL

There are many ways you can support the Indigenous Film Festival. Corporate sponsorships are available at the following levels: $5,000 (Platinum), $3000 (Gold), $1,000 (Silver), and $500 (Bronze) with appropriate recognition packages. Partnerships with other community groups and businesses are welcome. Click here to contact us for more information about sponsorhips.

Individuals can support the Film Festival through tax-exempt donations and by joining us at our daily screenings and festivities. The International Institute for Indigenous Resource Management is a non-profit 501(c)(3) corporation. Donations can be sent to the International Institute for Indigenous Resource Management at the address below or click here and follow the Make A Donation Online link on the Blacktie Colorado website.

International Institute for Indigenous Resource Management
444 South Emerson Street
Denver, CO 80209-2216
U.S.A.
303-744-9686 (for ticket information)

 

 

 
 

 

 

 

 
 

 

 
 

 

 
 

 

 
   


 
   


 
   



 
 


 
   

 

 
   

 

 
   

 

 
   

 

 



 

 

 
 

 

 
   

 


 

 

 
   

BECOME A FRIEND OF THE INDIGENOUS FILM FESTIVAL

There are many ways you can support the Indigenous Film Festival. Corporate sponsorships are available at the following levels: $5,000 (Platinum), $3000 (Gold), $1,000 (Silver), and $500 (Bronze) with appropriate recognition packages. Partnerships with other community groups and businesses are welcome. Click here to contact us for more information about sponsorhips.

Individuals can support the Film Festival through tax-exempt donations and by joining us at our daily screenings and festivities. The International Institute for Indigenous Resource Management is a non-profit 501(c)(3) corporation. Donations can be sent to the International Institute for Indigenous Resource Management at the address below or click here and follow the Make A Donation Online link on the Blacktie Colorado website.

International Institute for Indigenous Resource Management
444 South Emerson Street
Denver, CO 80209-2216
U.S.A.
303-744-9686 (for ticket information)